Do not be unequally yoked dating

Paradoxically, the scattered condition of the church, when properly evaluated, actually may improve prospects for an appropriate mate.

During my second sermon at the Feast this year I made a statement that several young people and even some of the older singles misunderstood.

Richard Ritenbaugh warns that dating outside the church is fraught with obstacles and potential dangers, yoking a believer with an unbeliever and exponentially complicating the spiritual overcoming and growth process, exposing one to perdition or providing a grievous cross to bear.

It is impossible to have the best of both worlds (the world and God's way).

"Unequally yoked" has evolved into a graded criterion for an optimal mate rather than a simple test for an acceptable one. Quality survey data reveal only two serious, churchgoing evangelical men for every three comparable women.

Thus, one out of every three evangelical women is not in a position to marry a man who's her "spiritual equal," let alone "head." This elevated standard now translates—for women, at least—to something like this: "Find that uncommon man ...

I wanted to take this opportunity to push back both on the assertion, and the way it's framed.

Or what does a believer have in common with an unbeliever?They no longer walk individually, but fastened together by the yoke, so therefore they walk as one.Believe it or not, the yoke makes the burden lighter.Four months ago, my wife Medina and I celebrated our one year anniversary since we married each other.No sooner than having ordered Medina's present did I stumble across Kathy Keller's "Don't Take it from Me: Reasons Why You Shouldn't Marry an Unbeliever." While the article is already well over a year old, it recently gained some traction on social media, attracting my attention.