Same sex dating violence

The National Violence Against Women survey found that 21.5 percent of men and 35.4 percent of women living with a same-sex partner experienced intimate-partner physical violence in their lifetimes, compared with 7.1 percent and 20.4 percent for men and women, respectively, with a history of only opposite-sex cohabitation.Transgender respondents had an incidence of 34.6 percent over a lifetime according to a Massachusetts survey.There has not been research on dating or domestic violence in the bisexual or transgender community, so we are soley commenting on abuse in gay and lesbian relationships.According to the National Resource Center on Domestic Violence, approximately 39 percent of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning and queer (LGBTQ) men and slightly more than half of LGBTQ women experience abuse from their partners.Many LGBTQ youth face obstacles that heterosexual couples don’t, which is why it’s so important to discuss the challenges they may face in the context of relationships.

He saw the underwear, and just flew into a rage, saying, 'How dare you wear those! '"José threw him on the floor of their bedroom closet, and smashed the only light bulb in the room, leaving them in darkness.

Many sexual assault programs struggle to reduce barriers for teens to access their services; in the case of LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer/questioning) youth, the barriers may be even more substantial.

It's important to note that the term "teen dating violence," while commonly used, is more aptly named "adolescent relationship abuse," which includes sexual and reproductive coercion and sexual assault as well as physical and emotional abuse.

The CDC’s 2010 National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey, released again in 2013 with new analysis, reports in its first-ever study focusing on victimization by sexual orientation that the lifetime prevalence of rape, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner was 43.8 percent for lesbians, 61.1 percent for bisexual women, and 35 percent for heterosexual women, while it was 26 percent for gay men, 37.3 percent for bisexual men, and 29 percent for heterosexual men (this study did not include gender identity or expression).

These studies refute the myths that only straight women get battered, that men are never victims, and that women never batter — in other words, that domestic violence is not an LGBT issue.